Alexander Ekman

Dance Open 2018: Left Right Left Right, Ballet of Slovene National Theatre Maribor

Dance Open 2016: Cacti, Semperoper Ballet Dresden

 

Ekman skillfully plays with everyday movements, juggles with tapping and twitching; he packs the whole paradoxality of the world into the morning gym set and it does not make him feel sarcastic but rather enthusiastic and tender.

Anna Galayda

 

He is known for his fast paced timing and witty humor and clever transitions. He aims to create work which the majority can connect to, finding subjects that we can all relate to. Since 2006 he has devoted his time creating pieces which both entertain and question the observer.

Ekman, who does not belong to any particular dance company and rather speaks of himself as a freelancer, is very demanded all over the world. His productions are running in more than 45 theatres in various countries and they are attracting the most vivid and energetic ballet stars who are eager to bring some new air in their repertoire.

He aims to transform the atmosphere in the auditorium and to always surprise the audience. “The most important question I always ask myself before I begin creating a new work is, Why do we need this piece?” – says Ekman.

His searches are not limited to choreography. He is directing films, looking for the new forms of show by integrating pop singers in the ballet performance and making out of the bodies of dancers the whole percussion orchestra… He is staging the surreal version of the Swan Lake in cooperation with a famous fashoin designer. For some of his works he also creates the music and scenography. And at the same time Alexander Ekman has only recently turned 30 and he is at the very beginning of his career path, that is promising to be one of the brightest of his generation.

I would rather work with a less talented hungry dancer than with a very talented jaded dancer.

I am afraid of the Ego. It brings so much shit into this world.

When crafting a ballet it is important that the piece will say something. You have this moment that can change something in people. Even how they feel.

Timing is important. How long does something work before we get bored of it.

Think why. Why do you want to do this? Don’t do it just for success. We don’t care about who you are – we care about what you do. Your work. Focus more on your work than being successful. I want people to care about my work, not me. I am just another dude.

 

Silly, clever and knowing.

The Guardian

A master of comic timing.

Financial Times

Unforgettable dance art.

Dagens Nyheter

Playful and humane, Humor, Style, and charm.

The Village Voice

Witty, effervescent, playful, surreal and joyously physical.

The Austrailan